Qu Nian Yan Hua Te Bie Duo (1998)

Genres - Crime  |   Sub-Genres - Crime Drama  |   Countries - Hong Kong   |   MPAA Rating - NR
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Qu Nian Yan Hua Te Bie Duo tells the story of a group of Chinese soldiers of the Hong Kong based British Army who have to look for new jobs after the 1997 transition when the Red Flag of the People's Republic of China replaces the Union Jack. Ga Yin feels like an abandoned child, and in order to reintegrate to society, he must begin from the beginning. His brother Ga Suen, younger by thirteen years, is a typical representative of the new generation. He is full of vitality and entrepreneurial spirit, with many ways of coming up with instant cash and no qualms about illegal deals. Ga Yin's ex-Army colleagues are all in the same boat. They are forgotten by both the British and the Chinese, they are not equipped to deal with the changes in society, and the economic crisis does not make it easy for them to find employment. Ga Suen's underground boss wants to take advantage of the combat skills of these desperate ex-soldiers and plans a big bank robbery. Violence breeds more violence. It is only by almost dying and being born again that Ga Yin can find a place in society, but it costs him his memory. Director Fruit Chan has been preoccupied with the Chinese take over and its effects for some time. This is the second in the trilogy exploring this theme that he began with Made in Hong Kong (1998). Ga Yin is a microcosm for the people of Hong Kong who had to start over after the hand over, facing predicaments similar to those experienced by the characters in the film. The director conveys his message by several visual metaphors such as the opening scene when we see a group of mean "floating" on a raft on the surface of the river. Qu Nian Yan Hua Te Bie Duo was screened as part of the International Forum of New Cinema section of the 49th Berlin Film Festival, 1999.

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Keywords

army, bank-robbery, Britain, China, employment, society