review for The Rage of Paris on AllMovie

The Rage of Paris (1938)
by Craig Butler review

A lovely screwball gem that, while not obscure, is also not as widely known as it well deserves to be, The Rage of Paris is a great antidote to the blues. Indeed, this frothy, bubbly, escapist delight is so charming that the only real response is to totally surrender. Sure, there are a few flaws. As with any screwball comedy, one has to be willing to suspend logic a wee bit here and there and to accept extreme coincidences as an everyday occurrence. But this artifice is part of the genre's appeal, and Paris is especially artful in its artifice. As an actress, Danielle Darrieux is perhaps not in the same league as other screwball stars (such as Carole Lombard), but it doesn't matter. She has more than enough acting chops for the part, and more importantly, she has the requisite personality and charisma that enables her to handle the role with the lightest of touches. Douglas Fairbanks Jr. is a great foil for her, Louis Hayward is near-perfect, and Helen Broderick and Mischa Auer are dependable as always. Throw in sleek Art Deco sets, beautiful costumes, and well-pitched direction, and the result is an enchanting laugh-fest.