review for Last Man Standing on AllMovie

Last Man Standing (1996)
by Derek Armstrong review

This pointless, third-rate update of Akira Kurosawa's Yojimbo is as clearly shot on a Hollywood soundstage as it is devoid of interesting ideas. The paper-thin sets are weightier than anything else that appears onscreen, as Bruce Willis kicks into full "mysterious outsider" mode as the gunslinger who plays the two rival gangs off each other in this now-familiar story that was also remade as A Fistful of Dollars. Suffice it to say that Willis is no Tushiro Mifune or Clint Eastwood. But even if he were capable of that presence, the material would have left him deader than the collection of bodies he piles up during 100 minutes of uninspired gunplay and general hooey. Walter Hill's always-marginal status as a genre director takes a further dip here, and by tripling as screenwriter and producer, he heaps the failure of this turkey even more on himself. The film also typifies the inevitable depths of Christopher Walken's slide into a career of playing menacing heavies, something he does in his sleep, and boy does it show. Last Man Standing should have been called "Last Man Sitting"; instead of measuring the film's body count, it could have documented which disgusted audience member would be the final one willing to endure this drivel before walking out.