review for The Fugitive on AllMovie

The Fugitive (1993)
by Rebecca Flint Marx review

Riddled with fast-paced action, taut suspense, and a blessedly wry, intelligent sense of humor, The Fugitive is one of the most thoroughly entertaining films ever to careen through the action genre. Directed with a sure, steady hand by Andrew Davis, the film's tight construction allows its lower-key moments to resound with the same compelling undertones as its action sequences; even the sight of Kimble's searching through medical files rings with nail-biting tension. Buoyed as much by its performances as by Davis' assured direction, The Fugitive benefits from the solid presence of Harrison Ford, here at his dependable, everyman best as the innocent Kimble, and a wily, Oscar-winning turn from Tommy Lee Jones as the relentless Gerard. The chemistry between the two adversaries is one of the film's most satisfying aspects, made so by believable, multi-dimensional characterizations that are all too rare in action films. Gerard is no idiot, and Kimble's eventual triumph is hard-won. Never possessing a clear, self-assured edge over his pursuers, his cleverness is well matched by that of the people determined to bring him to justice. The Fugitive contains enough tricks up its sleeve to satisfy even the most jaded action fans, and Ford fans will derive satisfaction from watching him prove that, though older and undeniably well-worn, he was still worthy of his status as one of the genre's most dependable heroes.