review for Promise Her Anything on AllMovie

Promise Her Anything (1964)
by Craig Butler review

While far from a classic, Promise Her Anything is a surprisingly appealing little sex comedy. Once one gets used to the fact that the all-important child in the plot (winningly played by the mostly silent Michael Bradley) is really nothing more than a device -- and therefore one needn't really worry about how often his mother misplaces him or whether Warren Beatty should be using him in his "titillating" mail-order movies -- there's actually a lot to enjoy in this mindless, but well-played, piece of fluff. Start with the cast, especially the trio of leads. Beatty is working in a delightfully "light" mode, and the result is one of his most effortlessly charming performances. Beatty manages the difficult trick of placing just enough weight on the silly plot turns to make them seem believably important, but not so much that they weigh the picture down. His partner in these escapades, Leslie Caron matches his tone beautifully and the two have a pleasant rapport that adds to the fun of the proceedings. Robert Cummings rounds out the triumvirate, mixing his innate niceness with just the right degree of priggishness. The supporting cast, especially the droll Hermione Gingold and the brassy Asa Maynor, is also first-rate. Director Arthur Hiller keeps things breezy and oh-so-1960s, and William Peter Blatty's screenplay is efficient, even if it is dated and unmemorable. Throw in Tom Jones singing a groovy little Bacharach-David ditty, and the result is an inconsequential, but agreeable, little movie.