review for Mannequin on AllMovie

Mannequin (1987)
by Derek Armstrong review

Mannequin stakes the claim of being the first time its inevitable idea was filmed, but little beyond that. Basically a screwball love story, the film mishandles almost all of its elements, leaving its success to be explained by popular curiosity, or perhaps, the fondness for the pert young Kim Cattrall. Although the film's tone of cheesy sentiment seems tailored to female viewers, the concept is total male wish fulfillment: a beautiful mannequin, ignorant of the ways of the modern world, comes to life and falls unquestioningly under the influence of the protagonist. A more intelligent treatment of the subject might have addressed the objectification of women implicit in the scenario, but this one drops the ball, opting for stupid gags and the lowest common denominator. Designing Women's Meshach Taylor has a few humorous moments as Andrew McCarthy's flamboyantly gay friend, but like much of the movie, his schtick goes on for so long that it becomes shrill and grating. Because it performed enough at the box office to become a minor cultural phenomenon, Mannequin is one of those movies that everybody remembers, but nobody revisits.