review for Live, Love and Learn on AllMovie

Live, Love and Learn (1937)
by Craig Butler review

While not an absolutely first rate screwball comedy, Live, Love and Learn has enough sparkle to make it an enjoyable way to pass the time, especially when one is in the mood for something on the lighter side. Oh, Live does make the mistake in its third act of thinking that it's more serious than it actually is, but fortunately it pulls back before it goes too far. The lessons learned, therefore, are superficial and comfortable and could definitely be considered as trite; but they're learned in such pleasant company that most viewers will shrug its failings off. That "pleasant company" primarily consists of the delightfully lovely Rosalind Russell and the engaging Robert Montgomery. Live is Russell's maiden entry into farcical territory, and she pulls it off with the same élan she would bring to such later efforts as The Women and Auntie Mame. Montgomery was already an old hand at this sort of fare, and he handles his role with all then aplomb one could ask for. Most importantly, there's an all important chemistry between the two stars that is absolutely essential for this type of film. The supporting cast isn't bad either, with a game Robert Benchley, a determined Helen Vinson and an arch Monty Woolley. George Fitzmaurice's direction is a bit on the timid side, which exposes the screenplay's weaknesses, but the cast keeps it moving.